EU election: Results for Thanet – overwhelming vote for The Brexit Party

Ballot process Photo TDC

The verification process of ballot papers in the EU election is complete. Count has place with results due from 10pm.

The voter turnout for Thanet was 36.11% – based on an electorate of 98,626 and 35,618 ballot papers returned.

Owing to the failure of the UK and the EU to reach a Brexit deal, the UK has been granted an extension to the Article 50 process for leaving the EU until October 31. This means that because no agreement has yet been reached, European elections have been held for UK representatives.

In the South East there are 10 seats. These were held by 4 Ukip, 3 Conservatives, 1 Labour, 1 Lib Dem, 1 Green, following the 2014 EU election.

The 2019 results are in for Thanet with an overwhelming poll in favour of The Brexit Party (49%), headed by Nigel Farage, Liberal Democrats polling second and Green Party third.

Change UK – The Independent Group 1,111
Conservative and Unionist Party 2,902
Green Party 4,323
Labour Party 3,054
Liberal Democrats 5,034
The Brexit Party 17,430
The Socialist Party of Great Britain 49
UK European Union Party (UKEUP) 84
UK Independence Party (UKIP) 1,356
Independent – McMahon, Jason Guy Spencer 46
Independent – Round, David Victor 28
Independent – Turberville, Michael Jeffrey 14

Across the south east The Brexit Party took 36.1% of the vote, giving them 4 seats. Lib Dems gained three seats with 25.8% of the vote, while Greens, Conservative and Labour each took one seat.

Nigel Farage

The MEPs elected from the South East are: Nigel Farage, Alexandra Lesley Phillips, Robert Rowland and Belinda De Camborne Lucy for the Brexit Party;

Catherine Bearder, Anthony Hook and Judith Bunting, Liberal Democrats;

Alexandra Phillips, Green;

Daniel Hannan, Conservative;

John Howarth, Labour.

Nationally 11 of the 12 regions have now been declared with The Brexit party on 31.6% of the vote – totalling 29 seats – Lib Dems on 20.3% and 16 seats, Labour on 14.1% and ten seats,  Greens with 7 seats, Conservatives 4, SNP 3 and Plaid one seat.

Northern Ireland is yet to be declared.

17 Comments

  1. Well I am pretty sure that shows what the people are REALLY thinking and not what the BBC ect. Try to make us believe with their EU favouritism and propaganda

    • Perhaps at last we can get on with the job we voted for in 2016. A Democratic vote was passed against the will of Tory party and billionaires who stand to lose face and money with what Heath dragged us into for his own gain in 1973. HEDGE FUNDS. Now Shell Companies of course. Capitalist greed simply at its ugliest.

  2. It seems to me that the whole of this Brexit affair is a distraction from the real damage which the Tories have been doing to this country for years. From the above figures,just over 50% of those who voted in Thanet voted for the Brexit Party. And only 36% of voters actually voted. So the election results actually show us what 36% of Thanet’s voting-age population are really thinking.

  3. This is about globalism versus nationalism.Globalism or Global capitalism as it should be better known, has improved the lives of Chinese peasant workers,but harmed the lives of blue collar industrial workers in the west.The results of this poll reflect that trend.
    Is more’free trade’ as proposed by Mr Farage actually going to improve the lives of blue collar workers and is it they who are driving the results here?
    From what can be seen it is mainly older voters, who (a) vote and (b) form a substantial part of the electorate who have spoken.
    Nationally there is not such a clear cut result and the picture is of two camps, dividing the nation.
    If there is a general election what are Mr Farage’s proposals on poverty,precarious work patterns, housing,homelessness,food banks,the NHS,and what will be very important to Brexit party voters sooner or later, adult social care?
    This was an election of trite phrases and ideological loyalties; these butter no parsnips in everyday economics as UKIP (remember them?) found to their cost.

  4. Very well said.
    The events of the past couple of years have lead me to think that those with an IQ lower than a hundred should be disenfranchised. Or at the very least, in response to the question “what does Brexit mean?” come up with a better answer than “Brexit means Brexit!”

    • I find it ironic you bring IQ into your argument when talking about brexiteers, evidently as a means to disparage them by stating that they are too stupid to be able to understand the consequences of their choices. By your metric, I would assume that you see people with under 100IQ as dregs of society that shouldn’t be allowed to vote.

      Guess who also started their lines of actual oppression and atrocity with that stance. Would it happen to be the Nazis? The people whose term you (general) are devaluing and normalising by using the term to silence those who you cannot argue or maybe just can’t fathom to bother trying to argue against, whether it be because evidently, as a person with a 100+ IQ, you see these people as beneath you, or maybe because it’s hard to argue with one word jargonisms such as “bigot”, “racist”, etc., when the people don’t actually care because they’ve heard it all before.

      And before you try the IQ arguement on me, mine is 147, and I have found that high IQ is not a metric to judge people on. The metrics you should use to judge a person are conviction, honesty, righteousness and loyalty, not intelligence. After all, the Tory elite are intelligent and look at the more they have ended up in with their evident hyper IQs.

    • its quite a simple concept really its called democracy enough said anything else I can help you with

  5. Maybe I should have left it as ‘”Or at the very least, in response to the question “what does Brexit mean?” come up with a better answer than “Brexit means Brexit!” ‘
    Nothing personal, Egg man.
    The UK is fractured down the middle, because of a really, really bad decision made by David Cameron to offer an in/out referendum. Clearly, many, many people voted (mostly to leave, I would suggest) without having a clue what “leave” actually meant. Blue passports? Making Britain (or perhaps England) Great again? Our Sovereignty back, whatever that means?
    So, choices are being made, choices that are going to affect all of us, including me.
    If those choices were based on facts and logical argument, or the consequences were not really important, I wouldn’t take issue.
    However, the consequences of Brexit (and no-one yet knows what that means, other than “Brexit”) are profound and long lasting. The decision to stay or leave should not be taken lightly.
    But it has been.
    Hence my rather tongue-in-cheek suggestion that only people who understand the issues should be allowed to vote on them.
    My IQ is a measly 135.

  6. The sooner we are away from the Bullying EU.
    We can start to rebuild this Great Country again.

    • Is that the Bullying EU – the one made up of democratically elected representatives?
      Or a different one somewhere?

  7. The reason we’re in this mess is because everybody seems to think that “advisory referendum” means “binding promise”.

    I can’t think of a good reason to leave the EU, but then I don’t know what my IQ is, and perhaps if it were a bit higher, I would.

  8. I don’t have an IQ of 135 or at least mine has never been tested (Testing the IQ of an individual is not as objective as is made out.The methodology is highly subjective and subject to a bias on social status of the person being tested), but I have looked at the stats.
    True enough, the Brexit party has scored well by scooping up UKIP voters and disaffected Tories, but leave parties received 35% of the vote and around 6m votes. Remain parties scored even higher in their areas and received around 40% or 9m votes.So the massive answer from the public may not be the one N.Farage suggests.The two big parties both have a serious conundrum in that their power-bases have voted the opposite to their perceived policies regarding Brexit.
    If the smaller parties do replicate something like this in a general election and that is a tall order, then proportional voting will be voted through.
    Wither Brexit? I don’t know , but if a new PM was to try it, he/she may come a cropper.

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