Friends of Ellington Park launch survey as part of restoration project

Take the Ellington Park survey to help the project Photo Michael Milham

The Friends of Ellington Park, with Thanet District Council, have launched a survey in their bid to improve site.

The group is carrying out a three-year project to renovate and restore parts of the park with the backing of the Heritage Lottery Fund Parks for People scheme.

The two phase process began in January this year when the Ellington Park project secured design and development funding to ensure all aspects of the park’s heritage, features and its current use are considered in the design.

The designs will be submitted to HLF by Summer 2018 for final approval. If agreed, works will start on the park in late 2018.

Photo Michael Milham

Heritage Lottery Funding will renovate the bandstand; restore the best features of the original 1893 Joseph Cheal landscape scheme; improve play facilities and provide a cafe and toilets. There will also be a five year scheme of activity in the park.

Thanet District Council and Friends of Ellington Park are working closely together with newly appointed design team: Landscape Architects  Allen Scott; architects  Clague and quantity surveyor Wooley Coles, to design a park for the people and unlock a £2million investment.

Photo Michael Milham

Ellington Park is 126 years old. The late Victorian and Edwardian landscaped area is across 13 acres of land. It was laid out in 1893 on what was once part of the estate surrounding Ellington House.

The park was designed by the Victorian landscape company Joseph Cheal and Son, known for their work at Hever Castle and Kirkstall Abbey.

Today, many of the heritage features of the park remain, including over 390 trees, which dapple the rolling slopes of the park enjoyed by some 9,000 visitors per year.

Photo Michael Milham

The Friends of Ellington Park are a committee made up of a group of local residents and park users committed to improving the facilities and environment of the park.

The Friends are instrumental in the upkeep and development of the site.

Find the survey here

Find out more about the park, and the friends, here

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